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Talipes Equinus

Clubfoot is a general term used to describe a group of deformities of the ankles and/or feet that are usually present at birth (congenital). The defect may be mild or severe and may affect one or both of the ankles and/or feet. Different forms of clubfoot may include talipes equinovarus in which the foot is turned inward and downward; calcaneal valgus in which the foot is angled at the heel with the toes pointing upward and outward; and metatarsus varus in which the front of the foot is turned inward. If not corrected, affected individuals may develop an unusual manner of walking (gait) in which weight is placed on the side of the foot (lateral) rather than on the sole. Clubfoot may be caused by a combination of hereditary and other factors (e.g., environment) and may occur as an isolated condition or due to a number of different underlying disorders.

Tapanui Flu

Until the late 1980s, myalgic encephalomyelitis was thought to be a distinct, infectious disorder affecting the central, peripheral and autonomic nervous systems and the muscles. Its major symptom was fatigue to the point of extended periods of exhaustion. A group of experts studying the Epstein-Barr virus first published strict criteria for the symptoms and physical signs of chronic fatigue syndrome in 1988. This case definition was further refined in 1994.

Tarsomegaly

Dysplasia epiphysealis hemimelica, also known as Trevor disease, is a rare skeletal developmental disorder of childhood. It is characterized by an overgrowth of cartilage on the ends (epiphyses) of the long bones of the arms and legs and the bones of the wrists (carpal bones) or the ankle (tarsal bones). The disorder may involve one epiphysis (localized) or multiple epiphyses. Most affected individuals develop a painless mass or swelling around the affected joint. Additional symptoms may develop in some cases. The exact cause of dysplasia epiphysealis hemimelica is unknown.

Teen Health

Acne. Bullying. Depression. Being a teenager can be tough. Whether you're a teen or a parent, itís smart to learn all you can about teen health issues. Our Learning Center is a great place to start.

Teething

Some babies are fussier than usual when they are teething. This may be because of soreness and swelling in the gums before a tooth comes through. These symptoms usually begin about 3 to 5 days before the tooth shows, and they disappear as soon as the tooth breaks the skin. Many babies don't seem to be affected by teething.

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